Skip to main content

Copyright

Copyright protects many types of creative works, such as music, books, drawings, paintings, computer software and films. Copyright protection is automatic once something has been created and usually lasts for the lifetime of the author plus a further 70 years.

Hornit’s story: the SME who used IP to combat the counterfeiters

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Business, Copyright, Design, Design right, Enforcement, Innovation, Patents, Trade marks
Hornit's bike rack, CLUG, holding several bikes upright in garage with person onlooking

Wheeling their way into the future, are Hornit - an innovative and creative British business that produces a wide range of cycling products. We spoke to their CEO Tom de Pelet about how Hornit has grown and how intellectual property …

Don't blow Christmas: avoid a mistake, spot the fake

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Copyright, Design, Enforcement, Trade marks

The IPO has collaborated with a range of enforcement partners to help consumers stay safe when shopping and to avoid counterfeit products. With prices dropping across retail and Christmas around the corner, Black Friday and Cyber Monday can be irresistible. Find out how you could be targeted by online traders selling counterfeit goods.

Levelling Up: how we’re helping UK businesses to build through IP 

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Business, Copyright, Design, Design right, Innovation, Levelling Up, Patents, Trade marks
Hand of engineer playing a blocks wood tower game (jenga)

Intellectual property (IP) is crucial to the UK’s future prosperity, so supporting innovation and economic growth is at the heart of the work we do at the IPO. IPO CEO Tim Moss takes a look at how IP plays a major role in the UK’s Levelling Up agenda.

IP matters...to Love Island

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Business, Copyright, Licensing, Trade marks

Love it or hate it, Love Island has become one of the UK’s most watched shows, with 5.9 million viewers in 2020. This year, “the most commercialised show on British television” allegedly netted more than £12 million in revenues. Find out how much of the show's spin-off success is based on brands commercialising their intellectual property.